Camp Ripley archery hunters can purchase permits in August

Hunters, who want to participate in the archery deer hunts at Camp Ripley near Little Falls, will be able to purchase permits without entering their names in a lottery.
Hunt permits will go on sale starting at noon on Friday, Aug. 28. The dates for this year’s event at Camp Ripley are Oct. 15-16 and Oct. 31-Nov. 1.
For 2020, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has changed the process and timeline to apply to the hunts due to the ongoing uncertainties of the COVID-19 pandemic. Not having a lottery allows the hunt to be quickly canceled in the event such a decision would be necessary. In August, hunters will be able to find hunt rules and details about how to participate in the hunt on the DNR website.
The archery hunt at Camp Ripley is an annual event. The DNR coordinates the hunt in collaboration with Central Lakes College Natural Resources Department, and the Department of Military Affairs, which manages the 53,000-acre military training area.

SOURCE: Minnesota DNR


Wisconsin DNR hunter safety classes resume July 13

MADISON, Wis. – In-person hunter and recreational vehicle education classes will resume July 13 under a set of guidelines and safety protocols released Friday by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources’ Recreational Safety and Outdoor Skills Section under Phase II of the Wisconsin State Government Bounce Back Plan.
The in-person hunter and recreational vehicle education classes resuming July 13 are for courses with 50 people or less. Based on a review of enrollment data for DNR hunter safety courses over the past three years, less than 2% of the more than 2,200 courses provided exceeded 50 attendees.
In March, the DNR temporarily suspended all in-person hunter education and recreational safety classes due to public health advisories relating to COVID-19. At the same time, the DNR also canceled, adjusted and postponed an array of other in-person public events, meetings, trainings and agency operations to protect public health.
The suspension reflected the dedication to safety by the DNR and the program, and provided the time to establish classroom guidelines to keep students and instructors as safe as possible from COVID-19 exposures.
The COVID-19 public health steps go beyond providing the educational safety courses for hunting, boating and off-highway vehicles, and will remain part of the safety class environment as classes start in July. The safety protocols are for the protection of students and instructors, and the communities where they live. The DNR will continue to prioritize the safety of the public, volunteer instructors, and department staff when determining protocols for resuming in-person recreational safety classes.
“We wish we had a one-size-fits-all plan. That is not possible because each safety class – whether it is hunter education or about recreational vehicle use – is different by location and the instructor,” said Lt. Warden Jon King, DNR Bureau of Law Enforcement administrator of the hunter education program. “However, the safety and the well-being of our students and our instructors remains priority Number One regardless of where the class takes place.”The DNR’s Recreational Safety and Outdoor Section will work collaboratively with volunteer instructors and partners to reopen DNR safety classes. The timeline is as follows:
* Instructors may start to enroll classes into GoWild on Sunday, June 28.
*Classes may start Monday, July 13.

SAFETY CLASS PARTICIPANTS CAN EXPECT THESE CHANGES:
* Social distancing of 6 feet between participants.
* Maximum of 50 participants in any one class.
* Attendees strongly recommended to wear face covering.  
* Sanitizing of class equipment.
* Availability and use of hand sanitizer.
* Outdoor class instruction where possible.
Wisconsin hunter education started in 1967 with a grassroots effort to reduce hunting incidents and to educate hunters to make them safe, responsible and ethical. Since then, multiple generations of families have attended hunter education. There have been over 20,000 volunteers who have helped educate the hunters of Wisconsin and approximately 1.2 million hunters have been certified. Incident rates for gun deer accidents continue to decrease with 9 years of gun deer seasons with no fatalities.
“Our intent is to go back to normal only when safe,” King said, adding that protocols may change as conditions do. “These safety rules and guidelines are essential until the ongoing pandemic threat is gone.”
The DNR remains strongly committed to the health and safety of recreational safety course instructors and students. The department continues to receive the most up-to-date information and will adjust operations as conditions change. Learn more about the DNR Safety Education Program on the DNR website.
For specific information regarding COVID-19 we encourage the public to frequently monitor the DHS website for updates, and to follow @DHSWI on Facebook and Twitter, or dhs.wi on Instagram. Additional information can be found on the CDC website.

SOURCE: Wisconsin DNR


Bear hunting application period opens July 1 for 2021 season


MADISON, Wis. – The application period for the 2021 bear hunting season will open July 1 after the successful completion of legislative review. The application deadline remains Dec. 10, 2020.
Applicants are reminded to be aware of the new bear management zone boundaries as their usual hunting grounds may change to a new unit beginning in 2021. State wildlife officials do not know precisely how these changes will specifically affect harvest permit wait times, but they expect there will likely be no significant changes across zones A, B, C and D. There will be no zone changes for the upcoming 2020 bear season.
Wisconsin bear hunting is prevalent, and more people apply each year than the number of licenses available. For 2020, more than 119,000 hunters applied for a permit or a preference point for 11,535 available permits.
The new zones are part of the Wisconsin Black Bear Management Plan, 2019-2029, developed by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Bear Advisory Committee and approved by the Natural Resources Board in May 2019. The new bear management zones are designed to address bear conflicts and manage desired population levels effectively.
People who would like to hunt black bear in Wisconsin must possess a Class A bear license. Hunters may obtain a Class A bear license by:
* Being selected in the bear drawing.
* Participating in the Learn to Bear Hunt Program.
* Receiving a Class A bear license transfer via the Awarded Permit Transfers Program or through Deceased Customer Preference Approval Transfer.
Applications are required for a Class A license or to receive a preference point. Hunters must apply at least once during a period of three consecutive years, otherwise, all previously accumulated preference points will be lost. Sign up to receive an email when the 2021 bear permit application opens.

SOURCE: Wisconsin DNR


4 Wisconsin hunters drawn for state’s 3rd managed elk hunt

MADISON, Wis. - Following a three-month application period, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources randomly drew four lucky Wisconsin residents who will have the opportunity to participate in the 2020 elk hunting season.
Just shy of 28,000 Wisconsin residents entered the drawing for one of four once-in-a-lifetime elk tags. The winners are from the cities of Appleton, Junction City, Marengo and McFarland.
"One of the more enjoyable tasks I have all year is calling the elk tag winners," said Kevin Wallenfang, DNR deer and elk ecologist. "They are always super excited and usually say something like, ‘You’ve got to be kidding!’ This year it just so happened to be one winner’s birthday, and it took a few minutes to convince him that I wasn’t one of his buddies playing a joke on him.”
In May, the Natural Resources Board approved a harvest quota of 10 bulls from the northern elk herd for the 2020 Wisconsin elk hunt, matching the number of tags from the 2019 season. Of the 10 tags, five will be awarded to state hunters, and the Ojibwe tribes will receive an allocation for the remaining five elk in accordance with their treaty rights within the Ceded Territory.
The fifth elk hunting license will be awarded through a raffle conducted by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. Raffle tickets may be purchased on the RMEF website, and the winner will be drawn at their state banquet in Wausau on July 25.
Application numbers increased by more than 4,000 compared to 2019. For each $10 application fee, $7 is earmarked for elk management, habitat and research in Wisconsin. Almost $11,000 in donations were also received thanks to the generous contributions of many applicants.
"Last year's hunters collected some very nice bulls and great stories of the hunt, so we're looking forward to continued success within the elk program that provides more hunting and elk viewing opportunities in the future," said Wallenfang.
The 2020 elk hunting season will occur only in Wisconsin’s northern elk range in parts of Ashland, Bayfield, Price, Rusk and Sawyer counties, where the first restoration effort was initiated with 25 elk from Michigan in 1995. The northern elk herd is projected to be approximately 300 animals this year.
Although the state’s central elk herd is projected to be approaching 100 elk this summer after calving, hunting is not recommended to occur there in 2020.
For more information regarding elk in Wisconsin, visit the DNR elk webpage here. To receive email updates regarding current translocation efforts, visit dnr.wi.gov and click on the email icon near the bottom of the page titled "subscribe for updates for DNR topics." Then follow the prompts and select the "elk in Wisconsin" and "wildlife projects" distribution lists.

SOURCE: Wisconsin DNR


Preliminary 2020 spring turkey harvest registrations jump

MADISON, Wis. – Preliminary totals show Wisconsin turkey hunters registered 44,963 birds during the 2020 spring turkey hunting season, nearly a 17% increase from the 38,576 birds registered in the 2019 season.
The 2020 youth season resulted in a total of 2,880 birds registered, up 47% from 1,953 in 2019. Harvest increased significantly across all zones and time periods compared to 2019 levels.
Although snow was persistent this winter in the northern half of the state, there were few long-lasting cold snaps, favorable spring brooding conditions in 2019 and late standing crops in many areas of the state, leading to a healthy and robust turkey population entering the spring season. Weather conditions were optimal for almost every period of the 2020 turkey season.
“The 2020 spring turkey season represents the highest harvest since 2016 and the second-highest harvest since 2010,” said Mark Witecha, Department of Natural Resources upland wildlife ecologist. “Good weather and enhanced opportunity for hunters this season likely contributed some to increased harvest, but ultimately we continue to have one of the healthiest turkey flocks in the nation here in Wisconsin.”
A total of 224,452 harvest authorizations were issued for the 2020 spring turkey season, a 5% increase from 2019, with 132,037 harvest authorizations awarded through the drawing and 92,415 sold over the counter.
Zone 1 produced the highest overall harvest at 11,689 birds, followed by Zones 3 and 2. Hunters registered 11,264 birds in Zone 3 and 10,934 birds in Zone 2. Overall, the statewide success rate was 20% compared to 18.1% in 2019.
The 2020 spring season started April 11, with the Youth Hunt. The regular season began April 15, and ran through May 26, with six separate time periods. Having separate periods allows for maximum hunter opportunities with a minimum amount of interference while ensuring a sustainable harvest.
Biologists in Wisconsin closely monitor harvest, hunter interference rates, hunter satisfaction and other information to track turkey populations through time to maintain a successful, enjoyable and sustainable spring turkey hunt.

SOURCE: Wisconsin DNR


Natural Resources Board approves 2020 elk harvest quota

MADISON, Wis. – The Natural Resources Board on Wednesday approved a harvest quota of 10 bulls from the northern elk herd for the 2020 Wisconsin elk hunt, matching the number of tags from the 2019 season.
Of the 10 tags, five will be awarded to state hunters, and the Ojibwe tribes will receive an allocation for the remaining five elk in accordance with treaty rights.
Hunters have just a few days left to apply for the opportunity to participate in northern Wisconsin’s 2020 elk hunt, the third managed hunt in state history.
Wisconsin residents can purchase elk tag applications through May 31 via Go Wild, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources license system. Each potential hunter may apply once online or by visiting a license agent.
The application fee is $10. For each application, $7 is earmarked for elk management and research in Wisconsin. During the first two hunting seasons, applicants generated over $400,000. These funds are being used to enhance elk habitat, which benefits both the northern and central elk herds and many other wildlife species that call the Northwoods home. Funding also contributes to ongoing elk research, monitoring and land access.
More than 60,000 Wisconsinites applied during the first two years of managed elk hunting, and nearly 25,000 have applied so far this year.
One bull tag is being raffled off by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. Raffle tickets are also $10 each, and there is no limit on the number of raffle tickets an individual may purchase.
Hunters who draw a tag in the state drawing will be notified in early June. Prior to obtaining the $49 elk hunting license, all winners are required to participate in a Wisconsin elk hunter education program offered in early September. The class will cover regulations, hunting techniques and more.
The 2020 hunting season will only occur for only the northern elk herd. Although the state's central elk herd has grown steadily since reintroduction in 2015, it’s projected to reach approximately 100 this summer after calving. As such, hunting is not recommended to occur there in 2020.
Wisconsin's elk hunting season will adhere to the following guidelines:
* Season open from Oct. 17 to Nov. 15, 2020, and Dec. 10-18, 2020.
* Only bull elk may be harvested.
* Only Wisconsin residents are eligible to receive an elk tag.
* An elk tag may be transferred to a Wisconsin resident youth hunter 17 years old or younger or to an eligible Wisconsin resident disabled hunter.
For more information about elk in Wisconsin, visit the DNR's elk webpage. To receive email updates regarding current translocation efforts, visit dnr.wi.gov and click on the email icon near the bottom of the page titled "subscribe for updates for DNR topics." Then follow the prompts and select the "elk in Wisconsin" and "wildlife projects" distribution lists.

SOURCE: Wisconsin DNR


DNR announces results of deer goal setting

The Department of Natural Resources has set new deer population goals that reflect Minnesotans’ diverse perspectives about deer.
“We really appreciate the perspectives brought to the table,” said Barbara Keller, DNR’s big game program manager. “We took what we heard seriously as we set goals.”
The DNR sets deer population goals – how much of an increase or decrease is desired in a deer population in a particular deer permit area – as part of managing the state’s wild deer herd.
The DNR set goals for 36 of the state’s 130 deer permit areas, generally those located in northwestern and western Minnesota. This was the first area of focus, and the DNR will be covering other areas in future years. The goals set in 2020 provide the framework for annual decisions on deer season regulations and are intended to be in effect for the next 10 years, with a midpoint review at five years.
The DNR gathered information and feedback from over 700 online survey respondents, online comments, and conversations with area wildlife managers. The DNR also used a new workshop format to facilitate eight small group discussions to both scope issues and create recommendations. These workshops replaced citizen advisory committees and public meetings that were used during deer goal setting in 2015.
Participants reviewed information related to deer populations, harvest trends, habitat, browsing impacts and public health and safety. They also provided feedback on locally important deer management factors. People can find key issues that influenced the goal changes detailed by permit area online.
In the first year of the renewed goal-setting process, the DNR focused on areas in the northwestern and western parts of the state. In general, the goals are to increase deer populations in the north, stabilize populations in the northwest and west, and slightly decrease populations in the central portions of the areas addressed this year.
“We are really happy with the participation and conversations we had,” Keller said. “We look forward to hearing from others in coming years.”
The DNR updates deer population goals in 14 regional goal-setting blocks comprising multiple deer permit areas. The goal-setting process will take four years to complete statewide, with several geographic blocks addressed each year. Next year’s process will include southwestern Minnesota and parts of northeastern Minnesota. The DNR lists complete details on the goal-setting webpage.

SOURCE: Minnesota DNR