Waterfowl Day scheduled Saturday

Youth, ages 15 and younger, can go waterfowl hunting Saturday, Sept. 8, on Youth Waterfowl Day, when accompanied by an adult who is not hunting, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
During Youth Waterfowl Day, hunters ages 15 and younger may take regular season bag limits of ducks and five Canada geese statewide, when accompanied by an adult 18 or older who is not hunting. The accompanying adult does not need a license.
Hunters, ages 13 to 15, must have a firearms safety certificate or apprentice hunter validation in their possession. Ducks, Canada geese, mergansers, coots and moorhens may be taken from a half-hour before sunrise to 4 p.m.
Motorized decoys may not be used. All other migratory bird hunting regulations apply.
Anyone interested in additional hunting resources can contact James Burnham at 651-259-5191 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. More information on waterfowl hunting can be found on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/hunting/waterfowl.

SOURCE: Minnesota DNR


Deer lottery application deadline Sept. 6

Firearms and muzzleloader hunters who want to harvest antlerless deer in a deer permit area designated as lottery this hunting season are reminded they must purchase their license by Thursday, Sept. 6.
Hunters who purchase their license before this date are automatically entered into the lottery for the deer permit area or special hunt area they declare.
This season, antlerless deer permits are issued by lottery in 39 of Minnesota’s 130 deer permit areas. No application is needed to take antlerless deer in permit areas with hunter choice, managed or intensive designations.
Hunters who want to participate in special firearm or muzzleloader deer hunts also need to apply for permits that are issued through a lottery, and that application deadline is also Sept. 6.
More information about designations and regulations for deer permit areas, as well as details about special hunt opportunities, is available on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/hunting/deer and in the 2018 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook.

SOURCE: Minnesota DNR


Mandatory testing set during archery deer season

When archery deer season opens Saturday, Sept. 15, mandatory testing for chronic wasting disease and restrictions on moving deer carcasses will again be in place in southeastern Minnesota’s CWD management zone, deer permit area 603.
Hunters are encouraged to plan ahead and be aware of the testing that will be required.
Archery hunters in deer permit area 603 will be required to submit the head from all adult deer 1 year old or older so lymph nodes can be tested for CWD. Hunters cannot remove the carcass or carcass remains outside the CWD zone until a test result is reported as not detected. Hunters can check their test results online at mndnr.gov/cwdcheck by entering their nine-digit MDNR number into the search box.
Carcass movement restrictions do allow hunters to immediately transport out of the zone quarters or other meat without the head or spinal column parts; boned-out or cut and wrapped meat; and antlers with a skull plate that is free of brain matter.
Complete details are available online at mndnr.gov/cwd/603.

SOURCE: Minnesota DNR


Youth Waterfowl, regular season Canada goose hunts open

MADISON - Regular-season Canada goose hunting opens Sunday, Sept. 16, along with the Youth Waterfowl Hunt Sept. 15-16.

Youth Waterfowl Hunt
This year's Youth Waterfowl hunt will be held Sept. 15-16. This special hunt offers youth hunters ages 15 and under the opportunity to learn skills from an adult without the increased hunting pressure encountered during the regular season.
"These two days provide a great opportunity for nearly 3,500 kids annually - many of which get out due to the generosity of a friend or family member," said Taylor Finger, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources migratory game bird ecologist.
Normal season bag limits apply, but all license and stamp requirements are waived for the youth hunt. However, participants still need to be HIP registered (free of charge) and possess both an early and a regular season goose permit if they wish to hunt geese during both days. Licensed adults may also hunt geese since the early and Exterior seasons are open during these dates.
Individuals of all ages and skill levels are reminded to check out a Learn to Hunt waterfowl clinic in their area to learn more about hunting and its role within conservation.

Regular Goose season
With resident Canada goose breeding numbers similar to recent years and average production of the Ontario breeders, hunters should have ample opportunities this year, and will again enjoy a full 92 days of hunting in the Exterior zone with a 3-bird daily bag limit.
"When combined with the 15 days of the early season, this puts WI at 107 days of Canada goose hunting, and the maximum season length allowed by federal law," said Finger
Exterior Zone Canada goose season structure is as follows:
* Northern Zone - Sept. 16 to Dec. 16.
* Southern Zone - Sept. 16 to Oct. 7 and Oct. 13 to Dec. 2 and Dec. 16- Jan. 3, 2019.
* Mississippi River Subzone - Sept.29 - Oct 5 and Oct. 13 to Jan. 3, 2019.
Hunters should note that the goose season is closed during the duck season split in both the South Zone (closed Oct. 8-12) and Mississippi River Subzone (closed Oct. 6 -12). The southern zone for the first time will also have a second split when duck season ends (closed from Dec. 3-15) and opening back up and running through Jan 3, 2019.
As a reminder, the Horicon Canada goose Zone was eliminated and is now a part of the Southern Exterior goose zone.
For more information regarding waterfowl hunting in Wisconsin, visit dnr.wi.gov and search keywords "waterfowl management."

SOURCE: Wisconsin DNR


Surplus permits available for Camp Ripley archery hunts

Hunters who missed the lottery deadline for the Camp Ripley archery hunt can purchase surplus permits on a first-come first-served basis beginning noon on Friday, Sept. 14, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
Hunters who already received a permit will not be allowed to purchase a surplus permit.
A total of 1,299 permits remain for the first hunt which runs Thursday, Oct. 18, and Friday, Oct. 19, while 75 permits remain for the second hunt which runs Saturday, Oct. 27, and Sunday, Oct. 28. A person may only purchase a permit for one of the hunts.
Hunters can purchase a surplus permit at any DNR license agent or online at mndnr.gov/buyalicense. Permits will remain on sale as long as they are available, or until Friday, Oct. 5. The cost of the permit is $14.
Hunters will need to use surplus permit code 677 and then choose from one of the two hunt dates: Oct. 18-19 (Thursday and Friday, code 668) or Oct. 27-28 (Saturday and Sunday, code 669). Successful applicants will receive a hunt packet in the mail, which includes a notice that is required to enter Camp Ripley.
The bag limit for this year’s hunt is two deer. Hunters may use their regular archery license, which is valid for either sex, or may use bonus permits to take antlerless deer. Additional rules and instructions are available on the DNR deer hunting webpage at mndnr.gov/hunting/deer.
The archery hunt at Camp Ripley is an annual event. The DNR coordinates the hunt in collaboration with Central Lakes College Natural Resources Department, and the Department of Military Affairs.

SOURCE: Minnesota DNR


It's time to plan this fall's Learn to Hunt event

MADISON - Hunting is right around the corner. If you have an interest and time, please consider sponsoring a Learn to Hunt event this fall. This is an opportunity to connect OR reconnect with a novice hunter (adult or youth) in our great outdoors.
A Learn to Hunt program can be a great introduction for those who might not come from a hunting family, or for adults who didn't get the chance to learn to hunt as a youth.
Emily Iehl, coordinator for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources R3 program, says it is up to current hunters to share your skills and passion with those who would like to learn, it is about passing on the great Wisconsin tradition of hunting. The R3 Team is a specialized team dedicated to recruitment, retention and reactivation of hunters, anglers and trappers
"You might find interest in unlikely places" Iehl said. "We've found that lots of young adults in the Madison area have interest in hunting for local, sustainable food. Other hunters I know have made connections with their neighbors, co-workers, and even doctors who have never had the chance to experience hunting."
Many people are open and interested in hunting, Iehl says, adding they need a friendly face to extend an invitation.
"When we focus on having a good time in good company, this reflects well on our hunting community and opens the door for others to join in," she said. " Let's start making memories."
Remember, if you're hosting a LTH pheasant, sponsors can get free pheasants from the DNR game farm for the event.
For more information on all your LTH needs, go to the DNR website, dnr.wi.gov, and search keyword "LTH."

SOURCE: Wisconsin DNR


Deer feeding ban continues in 11 Minnesota counties

A deer feeding ban is in place until at least 2019 for 11 central and north-central Minnesota counties surrounding two facilities where multiple captive deer were infected with chronic wasting disease.
“Feeding bans in central and north-central Minnesota are precautionary and part of our overall strategy to limit CWD, if it exists in wild populations,” said Lou Cornicelli, wildlife research manager for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “Wild deer in these areas are not known to have CWD. These feeding bans are a proactive step to keep CWD at bay.”
In 2017, the DNR completed the first of three years of surveillance in these areas and no disease was found.
Central Minnesota counties affected by the ban are Kandiyohi; McCloud; Meeker; Stearns; Wright; and the portion of Renville County north of U.S. Highway 212.
North-central Minnesota counties affected are Aitkin; Crow Wing; Morrison; the portion of Cass County south of Minnesota highways 34 and 200; and the portion of Mille Lacs County north of County Road 11.
Attractants are not prohibited in the central and north-central counties.
In Fillmore, Houston, Olmsted, Mower, Wabasha and Winona counties, a ban on both deer feeding and use of attractants has been in place since 2017 and will continue for the foreseeable future. Wabasha County was added this year because CWD was detected in captive deer in Winona County.
“People should know that feed is not just a pile of corn or grain,” Cornicelli said. “It includes salt and mineral blocks that many hunters use as well as fruits, vegetables, nuts, hay and other food that is capable of attracting or enticing deer.”
One of the most probable mechanisms for CWD spread among deer is over a food or attractant source that concentrates animals. Feeding bans are intended to reduce the number of areas where deer can come into close contact, either directly or indirectly.
The feeding ban in southeastern Minnesota also includes attractants such as deer urine, blood, gland oil, feces or other bodily fluids. These products include such things as bottled estrus and mock scrape drips.
People who feed birds or small mammals must do so in a manner that prevents access by deer or place the food at least 6 feet above the ground.
Food placed as a result of normal agricultural practices is generally exempted from the feeding ban. Cattle operators should take steps that minimize contact between deer and cattle.
“Not feeding deer is a simple step that anyone can take to help prevent the spread of disease,” Cornicelli said. “Although well-intentioned, feeding wildlife often does more harm than good.”
Mandatory precautionary CWD testing will be done over opening weekend of the firearm season in portions of the feeding ban areas to determine whether the disease may have spread from captive to wild deer. This year, the DNR has narrowed the surveillance area and more information can be found on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/cwd.

SOURCE: Minnesota DNR